Lostwithiel Area U3A
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Garden Bird report February 3rd 2021 by the Lostwithiel U3A Bird watching Group


As Lockdown continues and fieldtrips as a group are not possible the group decided to meet via zoom to compare each other’s garden bird sightings including results from the previous weekend’s RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch which many of the group had taken part in.

The group largely fitted into 3 broad areas, Lostwithiel, Bodmin Moor villages and Wadebridge.

Lostwithiel – Medium gardens, 3 were within the town area and one on the edge. All fed their birds even though not always daily and had water baths and the one on the edge a pond. The food provided was given as sunflower hearts, peanuts, Niger seeds, mixed seed and fat balls.

There was a good range of birds recorded.

Goldfinch, Blackbird, Robin, Wren, Blackcap, Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, House Sparrow, Dunnock, Greenfinch, Magpie, Jackdaw, Crow and Seagulls of unspecified varieties.

The garden on the edge of the town could add, Greater spotted Woodpecker, Pheasant, Bullfinch, Nuthatch, Marsh tit and a Kingfisher on the pond.

Moorland Villages

St Breward - A garden edging onto fields and the food provided is peanuts and sunflower hearts. The Birds found include a lot of Sparrows which nest in the garden as well. Others sited are Bluetit, Long tailed tit, Goldfinch, Greenfinch, Greater Spotted Woodpecker, Starling, Nuthatch, Blackbirds, Jackdaw, Wren, Robin.

Mount – Three gardens here and two are located on opposite ends of the village, a large one next to small woods and open moor, another large one exposed to agricultural land and a small one in the middle overlooking a field. These gardens provided sunflower hearts, apples, Niger seed, mixed seed, fat balls and peanuts and all the gardens had ponds and birdbaths of varying sizes with nest boxes on site.

Birds sited as mentioned above are, Starlings and House Sparrows in large numbers, Sparrowhawk, Blue tit, Coal tit, Blackbird, Jackdaw, Nuthatch, Wren, Robin, Greenfinch, Goldfinch, Long tailed tit, Pheasant, Great tit, Dunnock, Magpie, Marsh tit, Crow.

Birds not mentioned in Lostwithiel are, Song Thrush, Siskin, Wood Pigeon, Yellow Hammer, Rooks, Chaffinch, Tree Creeper, Pied and Grey Wagtail, Collared Dove, Wood Pigeon, Buzzard, Jay, Redwing, Tawny Owl. Barn Owls can be heard at night and Lesser Black backed Gull flocks often fly overhead along with other unspecified gulls.

Wadebridge – a garden in the town above the Camel River estuary. The birds are fed fat balls, sunflower hearts and scraps.

Birds sited are Herring gulls, Jackdaw, Robin, Blackcap, Blue tit, House sparrows which nest in the garden, Starling with Canada Geese and Buzzard overhead.

Though we recognised the lists are not necessarily complete but are a snapshot, the group as a whole were able to declare some 40 bird species between them covering the 3 broad locations. There appears to be some difference between the areas as to what you are likely to see in the garden and no doubt the food offered would make some difference too. It is hoped to carry out a similar exercise in the summer to compare what is going on in the gardens then by comparison.

The group discussed the importance of recording our birdlife sightings and the use of the BirdTrack App to record species found – very simple to download and use on your Smartphone/Laptop /computer.

Compiled by Jasmina Goodair

 

Garden Bird report February 3rd 2021 by the Lostwithiel U3A Bird watching Group


As Lockdown continues and fieldtrips as a group are not possible the group decided to meet via zoom to compare each other’s garden bird sightings including results from the previous weekend’s RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch which many of the group had taken part in.

The group largely fitted into 3 broad areas, Lostwithiel, Bodmin Moor villages and Wadebridge.

Lostwithiel – Medium gardens, 3 were within the town area and one on the edge. All fed their birds even though not always daily and had water baths and the one on the edge a pond. The food provided was given as sunflower hearts, peanuts, Niger seeds, mixed seed and fat balls.

There was a good range of birds recorded.

Goldfinch, Blackbird, Robin, Wren, Blackcap, Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, House Sparrow, Dunnock, Greenfinch, Magpie, Jackdaw, Crow and Seagulls of unspecified varieties.

The garden on the edge of the town could add, Greater spotted Woodpecker, Pheasant, Bullfinch, Nuthatch, Marsh tit and a Kingfisher on the pond.

Moorland Villages

St Breward - A garden edging onto fields and the food provided is peanuts and sunflower hearts. The Birds found include a lot of Sparrows which nest in the garden as well. Others sited are Bluetit, Long tailed tit, Goldfinch, Greenfinch, Greater Spotted Woodpecker, Starling, Nuthatch, Blackbirds, Jackdaw, Wren, Robin.

Mount – Three gardens here and two are located on opposite ends of the village, a large one next to small woods and open moor, another large one exposed to agricultural land and a small one in the middle overlooking a field. These gardens provided sunflower hearts, apples, Niger seed, mixed seed, fat balls and peanuts and all the gardens had ponds and birdbaths of varying sizes with nest boxes on site.

Birds sited as mentioned above are, Starlings and House Sparrows in large numbers, Sparrowhawk, Blue tit, Coal tit, Blackbird, Jackdaw, Nuthatch, Wren, Robin, Greenfinch, Goldfinch, Long tailed tit, Pheasant, Great tit, Dunnock, Magpie, Marsh tit, Crow.

Birds not mentioned in Lostwithiel are, Song Thrush, Siskin, Wood Pigeon, Yellow Hammer, Rooks, Chaffinch, Tree Creeper, Pied and Grey Wagtail, Collared Dove, Wood Pigeon, Buzzard, Jay, Redwing, Tawny Owl. Barn Owls can be heard at night and Lesser Black backed Gull flocks often fly overhead along with other unspecified gulls.

Wadebridge – a garden in the town above the Camel River estuary. The birds are fed fat balls, sunflower hearts and scraps.

Birds sited are Herring gulls, Jackdaw, Robin, Blackcap, Blue tit, House sparrows which nest in the garden, Starling with Canada Geese and Buzzard overhead.

Though we recognised the lists are not necessarily complete but are a snapshot, the group as a whole were able to declare some 40 bird species between them covering the 3 broad locations. There appears to be some difference between the areas as to what you are likely to see in the garden and no doubt the food offered would make some difference too. It is hoped to carry out a similar exercise in the summer to compare what is going on in the gardens then by comparison.

The group discussed the importance of recording our birdlife sightings and the use of the BirdTrack App to record species found – very simple to download and use on your Smartphone/Laptop /computer.

Compiled by Jasmina Goodair